Tom Shields
2117 General Classroom Bldg.
Phone: 328-6715
Office Hours: TTH 10:00-11:00
TTH 3:30-4:00
W 10:30-11:30

 
 

Roanoke Island and the "Lost Colony" Over the Past 410 Years

Honors Seminar 2011, sec. 002
Spring 1997
TTH 9:30-10:45
GCB 1001

 

Required Books:

 Hariot, Thomas. A Briefe and True Report of the New Found Land of Virginia. New York: Dover, 1972.

 houston, lebame, and Barbara Hird, eds. Roanoke Revisited: The Story of the First English Settlements in the New World and the Fabled Lost Colony of Roanoke Island. Manteo, NC: Penny Books, 1997.

 Noël Hume, Ivor. The Virginia Adventure, Roanoke to James Towne: An Archaeological and Historical Odyssey. New York: Knopf, 1994.

 Quinn, David Beers. Set Fair for Roanoke: Voyages and Colonies, 1584-1606. Chapel Hill: U of North Carolina P, 1985.

 Course Booklet available at the Student Store.

 Materials on reserve at Joyner Library and, when available, through the World Wide Web.

 Assignments:
January 13 Introduction
15 The Background of the Roanoke Ventures:
•houston and Hird, "Letter from the Editors," Roanoke Revisited, pp. [4]-[7].
•Quinn, "Raleigh's Involvement in the North American Enterprise," Set Fair for Roanoke, pp. 3-19.
20 The 1584 Voyage—History:
•Quinn, "Preliminaries of the 1584 Voyage" and "The Initial Contact," Set Fair for Roanoke, pp. 20-44.
22 The 1584 Voyage—The Primary Documents:
•Arthur Barlowe, "Narrative of the 1584 Voyage," Roanoke Revisited, pp. 11-20.
27 The 1585-86 Voyage and Settlement—History:
•Quinn, "Planning the First Virginia Voyage," "The 1585 Voyage," "Founding the Colony: The First Steps," and "The Settlers, 1585-86," Set Fair for Roanoke, pp. 45-98.
29 The 1585-86 Voyage and Settlement—History (cont.):
•Quinn, and "Explorations," "The Final Phase," "Rescue and Frustration, 1586," and "A Colony Which Died," Set Fair for Roanoke, pp. 99-154.
February 3 The 1585-86 Voyages and Settlements—Primary Documents:
•Ralph Lane, "Ralph Lane's Letter to Richard Hakluyt the Elder and Master H. of the Middle Temple," Roanoke Revisited, pp. 23-24.
•Ralph Lane, "Ralph Lane's Discourse of the First Colony," Roanoke Revisited, pp. 27-36.
•Richard Hakluyt, "The 1586 Voyages," Roanoke Revisited, pp. 41-42.
5 The 1587 Voyage and Settlement—History:
•Quinn, "A Colony is Launched" and "A Colony Created," Set Fair for Roanoke, pp. 241-94.
10 The 1587 Voyage and Settlement—Primary Documents:
•John White, "John White's Narrative of His 1587 Voyage," Roanoke Revisited, pp.43-55.
12 The 1589 Aborted Voyage and the 1590 Voyage:—History:
•Quinn, "The Years of Frustration, 1587-1589" and "A Last Voyage," Set Fair for Roanoke, pp. 295-338.
17 The 1589 Aborted Voyage and the 1590 Voyage:—Primary Documents:
•John White, "John White's Narrative of the 1590 Voyage to Virginia," Roanoke Revisited, pp.59-72.
•John White, "John White to Richard Hakluyt," Roanoke Revisited, pp. 77-78.
19 Early Historical Approaches:
•John Lawson, from A New Voyage to Carolina, Library Reserve or World Wide Web.
•John Lederer, from The Discoveries of John Lederer, Library Reserve or World Wide Web.
•Robert Beverly, Chapter 1, The History and Present State of Virginia, Library Reserve or World Wide Web.
24 Nineteenth-Century Historical Approaches:
•Francois-Xavier Martin, from Chapter 2, The History of North Carolina, from the Earliest Period, vol. 1 (New Orleans: A. T. Penniman, 1829), 27-37. Library Reserve or World Wide Web.
•Charles Campbell, Chapter 1, "History of the Colony and Ancient Dominion of Virginia," Southern Literary Messenger 13.2 (Feb. 1847): 67-71. Library Reserve or World Wide Web.
•George Bancroft, Preface, Introduction and Chapter 5, History of the United States of America, from the Discovery of the Continent, final ed., vol. 1 (New York: Appleton, 1883), iii-v, 1-3, 60-83. Library Reserve.
26 The Roanoke Colonies—Television Documentaries:
•Naughton, Tom, and Nicholas Valcour, prod., "The Riddle of Roanoke," dir. Joseph Wiecha, writ. Eleanor Grant, Archaeology, The Learning Channel, 1994.
•Lunderg, Maria, prod., "Croatan Project," North Carolina Now, UNC-TV, Summer 1996.
BOOK REVIEW PROJECTS DUE
March 3 Ethnology and Natural History—Primary Sources:
•Hariot, A Briefe and True Report of the New Found Land of Virginia. (Earliest editions without De Bry engravings available on World Wide Web.)
5 Ethnology—Archaeological and Anthropological Approaches:
•David Sutton Phelps, "Archaeology of the North Carolina Coast and Coastal Plain: Problems and Hypotheses," The Prehistory of North Carolina: An Archaeological Symposium, ed. Mark A. Mathis and Jeffrey J. Crow (Raleigh: North Carolina Division of Archves and History, 1983), 1-51. Library Reserve.
•Quinn, "The World of Men," and "Englishmen and Native Americans," Set Fair for Roanoke, pp. 182-237.
10 The Roanoke Ventures—Historical Archaeological Approaches:
•Noël Hume, Prologue, "Whosoever Commands the Sea," and "The New Fort in Virginia," The Virginia Adventure, pp. xxv-xxviii, pp. 3-53.
•Quinn, "An Archaeological Resurrection?," Set Fair for Roanoke, pp. 379-412.
12 The Search for the Lost Colony:
•Noël Hume, "The Cittie that Never Was," The Virginia Adventure, pp. 54-96.
Quinn, "A Colony is Lost and Found?," Set Fair for Roanoke, pp. 341-377.
17 SPRING BREAK
19 SPRING BREAK
24 Roanoke and Jamestown:
•Noël Hume, "West from the Azores," "Most Welcome and Fertile Place," "Arrows of Outrageous Fortune," and "Alarums and Excursions," The Virginia Adventure, pp. 97-213.
26 Literary Approaches to the Roanoke Colonies—Nineteenth-Century Stories:
•Edward Ingle, "Roanoke: A Tale of Raleigh's Colony," The Overland Monthly Nov. 1896: 470-83. Library Reserve or World Wide Web.
•Cornelia L. Tuthill, "Virginia Dare: or, The Colony of Roanoke," Southern Literary Messenger 6.9 (Sept. 1840): 585-595. Library Reserve or World Wide Web.
31 Literary Approaches to the Roanoke Colonies—Early Twentieth Century:
•Sallie Southall Cotten, "Forgotten Facts and Fancies," Preface, Prologue, and "Seeds of Truth," The Legend of Virginia Dare (Manteo, NC: Roanoke Island Historical Association), pp. i-xx, 5-28. Course Booklet.
April 2 Literary Approaches to the Roanoke Colonies—Early Twentieth Century (cont.):
•Sallie Southall Cotten, "The Legend of the White Doe," The Legend of Virginia Dare (Manteo, NC: Roanoke Island Historical Association), pp. 31-79. Course Booklet.
7 Literary Approaches to the Roanoke Colonies—Twentieth-Century Drama:
•Paul Green, Act I, The Lost Colony, 400th Anniversary ed. (n.p.: n.p., 1980), pp. 3-58. Course Booklet.
9 Literary Approaches to the Roanoke Colonies—Twentieth-Century Drama (cont.):
•Paul Green, Act II, The Lost Colony, 400th Anniversary ed. (n.p.: n.p., 1980), pp. 59-130. Course Booklet.
14 Popular Media and the Roanoke Colonies:
•"The Lost Colony," Lovejoy (video).
16 Popular Media and the Roanoke Colonies (cont.):
•"The Lost Colony," Lovejoy (video).
21 Literary Approaches to the Roanoke Colonies—Contemporary Literature:
•William Least Heat Moon, Chapters 5-12, Blue Highways (New York: Fawcett Crest, 1982), pp. 51-66. Course Booklet.
•Gerald Hausman, "The Story of the White Deer Named Virginia Dare," Tuakashila (New York: St. Martin's P, 1994), pp. 229-231. Course Booklet.
23 Student presentations of Research Projects
28 Student presentations of Research Projects (cont.)
May 1 Student presentations of Research Projects (cont.)
RESEARCH PAPERS DUE
5 STATE HOLIDAY MAKEUP DAY (No Class—Friday Classes Meet)
7 READING DAY (No Classes)
14 FINAL EXAM PERIOD (8:00-10:00 a.m.)

Grades:
Grades will be determined by a book review project, a research paper, an oral presentation on the research done for the research paper, several in-class writings, and a final in-class essay exam. The breakdown of the final grade is as follows:
 
 
Book Review Project 15%
Research Paper 30%
Oral Presentation of Research 10%
In-Class Writings 20%
Final Examination _25%
100%

 

Book Review Project:
Each student will do a 4-5 page typed comparative review of three critical/analytical works (books and/or articles) on a subject related to Roanoke colonization. The best idea is to pick works that might be used for the research paper. Only one of the works may be from the syllabus. The format for the review project will be discussed in class.

 Research Paper and Oral Presentation:
Each student will research an area of interest to him or her related to Roanoke colonization. Students should discuss with the professor their intended area of research. This research will result in a 10-15 page typed research paper. You may use any documentation format, though what format you use should be indicated to the professor. In addition to the paper, a 10 minute oral presentation of your research results will be presented to the class. Please be aware that you cannot simply read your research paper for the oral presentation—a ten page typed paper takes approximately 20 minutes to read. Instead, a summary presentation of some form will need to be developed.

 In-Class Writings:
There will be several short (1-2 paragraph), unannounced essay responses to reading assignments done throughout the semester. These are open-book and require the student to analyze works assigned for that particular class period (and, sometimes, earlier assignments).

 Examinations:
The final in-class essay will be an open-book, open note essay that will compare the different approaches studied during the semester as applied to a single subject about Roanoke Island colonization. The essay may be outlined in advance, but it must be written during the final examination period on Tuesday, May 12, from 8:00-10:00 a.m. Each student will pick the specific topic he or she wishes to write about, though it is suggested that he or she discuss the choice with the professor before the exam. The in-class essay will not be graded on grammar and/or spelling.